What or Who is beautiful?

 

For too many years beauty has been identified with physical appearance and submission. Watch television or take part in life and you will be bombarded with a particular look or model of what  big business has defined as beautiful.  We are challenged to identify with fake photoshopped images that create an outward appearance, which for most people is unobtainable. Simply submit to a product or lifestyle that we never desired, probably are unable to afford, and  all the pleasures of heaven can be ours.

It is all quite ridiculous, but we still buy it! We feel ugly or ashamed if we do not fit the accepted model of what corporations define as beautiful. We spend so much time looking  in the mirror at our outward appearance that we forget about the feelings and emotions that are within us.

It has been this way for years, maybe since the beginning of time. Men and women have been programmed to fill a role; a role that someone in authority defined. Generally, it has been the women who have been suppressed. But the control is buried so deeply in our culture that it is hard to realize how firmly it is there .

It’s not easy for men or women to re-wire their brain when it has been conditioned to think a certain way from childhood. How can they over-come the paternalistic control that corporations and politicians may want to have over their thoughts and choices?

It is only when you start to look at the inside, instead of the outside, that life will become clear. What or who is beautiful? True beauty reflects those inner qualities of a person that are grounded in LOVE  and so resonate the soul.

 

How to Grow Your Church

who

 

For years churches have been loosing touch with the younger generation. Now days, that could mean most people under the age of fifty. What can a church do to turn this around?

 

 

Forget about traditional advertising.

Start listening to people and building a direct relationship with them.

Have a good webpage and a social media presence.

Focus on who those people are: your true fans, and on how the church can connect with them.

Go to where they are, and where they are is on Facebook, twitter and You Tube.

Don’t look for likes on your Facebook page, but like their pages first.

Be active on every blog that relates to church activities, but don’t expect everyone to come to you.

If your twitter feed is nothing but announcements about coming events and no one is sharing your content, think about adapting your content strategy.

Get creative. You can answer real questions, and give customers a sneak peek into your church and into what it will look like in the future.

Above all:

  • deliver value
  • be open
  • be clear and consistent
  • create a mutually beneficial world

Find and nurture your true fans. Your heavy users will become evangelists for you and then you will begin to experience a network effect .

The Double-Loop Theory of Change

In order to continue in these time of rapid change organizations, including the church, need to recognize some basic theories about how social and cultural organizations change. One such theory is known as the double loop theory of change . As one institution approaches the end of its time, innovators from within evolve in new ways, eventually replacing the old organization with something new and different. The following illustration shows how it works: (clicking on it may help you see the details.)

double loopSome innovations fail, but others succeed and communities of support form around them. As these new communities evolve they gain supporters from the old organization who help steward the process as it continues on.

There are many organizations and processes in Western society beginning their descent to oblivion. In these rapidly changing times we need innovators willing to risk the leap and, in so doing, keep our culture from decay.

Life: A Continual Stream of New Beginnings

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It is spring in Victoria, as new life pushes aside the decay of yesterday and offers the promise of future abundance.

So too this blog, at personalhistorian.ca, rises into being. Building on the experience of many posts on so many blogs now past, I hope it will become the central blog from which many contributions will spring forth.